SOLO

exhibition

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Nelson

Norman

UNITED STATES

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“Glazing techniques require layers of paint well dried before light washes of color are applied.”

Norman Nelson Arts and The Peregrine Fund, present, THE HAWK, an art show on birds of prey by artist Norman Nelson. The show was started in l980 with the first oil on canvas raptor painting called, “The Falcon and the Eagle” a large painting depicting a Prairie Falcon attacking a Golden Eagle that has invaded its territory. The idea came from Morley Nelson, Norman’s father an internationally known conservationist and well-known falconer. Morley was instrumental in helping with the recovery work for the endangered Peregrine Falcon.

An arctic Anatum Peregrine Falcon in flight over the nesting cliff habitat

Norman’s art mentor, John Collias, a professional oil portrait painter helped with techniques and approaches to wildlife paintings as well inspiring more artful experimentation. Norman painted Peregrines in the l980’s in response to the worldwide efforts to save the falcon from extinction. Three significant paintings on eagles were completed with critiques from Mr. Collias.

Eagle Eyes/print

Oil

$425

Giclee prints only of this painting portrait of a Golden Eagle

“Eagle Eyes”, was the first larger format painting. It was nontraditional in the fact that the head is full frame, proportionally correct but unrealistically large. The result is a striking predator portrait with thick paint and glazing strokes over the eyes to give impact.

“As better works came forth larger format efforts challenged the approaches.”

Norman wanted a new style for his works and studied European wildlife artist’s techniques, materials, and approaches with the idea of bringing motion and less detail to the work. The layers in paints cover the dark underpainting with swift brush strokes using thin mixtures so the under layers are just visible.

“The glaze in painting reduces detail and gives an illusion of action, and motion.”

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Since Peregrines are the fastest birds for prey and eagles are the largest these new approaches and techniques convey the reality of birds of prey in their speed and against their vast habitats. In the earlier work the background was detailed with hard edges. The six new paintings emphasize the birds against an abstract background.