SOLO

exhibition

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom
1/9

Cardenal

Andrea

UNITED STATES

Yellow and Black Photography Quote (1).p

“I do not make art to sell… I seek growth and change, both as an artist and as a person, as an ongoing process of becoming.”

When I started painting at a young age, I developed an interest in the realistic representation of the outer world. I began by drawing portraits and landscapes – mainly those with a body of water where I could play around with light and reflection. The keen observation of the human face developed, and I focused mainly on portraiture, but was always unsatisfied and hyper-focused on the flaws and imperfections I saw in my work. On a personal level, I tend to like to be in control of my surroundings. Being a self-taught artist, the level of mastery I was requiring of myself turned into frustration and I would often go months or sometimes even years without painting, because I could neither move on from an unfinished work or start over.

During the pandemic, I was inspired to create art that was on the minimalist side, often turning to basic monochromatic colors, within a series titled Living With Less. After a long period of isolation and turbulence, I wanted to bring a little levity to my art. I was not previously a fan of floral art, but I was inspired to create this series of abstract florals to represent a sense of rebirth and a blossoming of hope to commemorate what it felt like the world was collectively experiencing.

Then I discovered a passion for abstract art; particularly for paintings with texture and movement. We often hear of abstract paintings “Oh, that looks so easy. I could have done that!” That rings true for me – I had deeply underestimated the skill it takes to make true beauty out of abstract work. So, when I tried it, I found that it challenged me. I liked that, and I began using free-flow styles that allowed me to set free expectations, as they did not allow for perfection and control. Then, art became a sort of therapy; a way to free myself of self-imposed constraints and embrace the imperfections I found within and without.

Orchid

Acrylic

$34,500

After isolation and turbulence, I wanted to bring a little levity to my art. I was inspired to create this series of abstract florals to represent a sense of rebirth and a blossoming of hope to commemorate what it felt like the world was collectively experiencing.
While the colors are bright, there is still a sense of distortion. The flowers are not easily identified, and while you have a sense of familiarity you also get the feeling you are seeing something divergent from reality.

This has been especially true in recent years through personal difficulties; new motherhood, the loss of my unborn child, isolation through the pandemic, mental health struggles and other hurdles – some I’ve yet to overcome. And so, the thought that “art is pretentious” that had lived in my head for so long, also flew out the window as I began creating work that was deeply personal and talking to real artists whose work also spoke to me, hearing their own stories and the meaning behind their art.

“Spontaneity is at the center of my art, as it expresses personal emotions, contemporary societal issues and explores my thought processes…”

The choice of an expressive medium by an artist has multiple meanings, and in my case, I like to vary my mediums greatly as I do my painting styles. I do this because I tire quickly of repetition, and I like to challenge myself. When something comes too easily, it no longer holds the same meaning for me.
Spontaneity is at the center of my art, as it expresses personal emotions, contemporary societal issues and explores my thought processes through different techniques, materials and tools used. My process is instinctive and organic, creating without judgement as ideas emerge from my subconscious while trying to find harmony in the elements I have created.
The common denominator is grounded in a special fascination for exploration, newness, freshness. Creating something that surprises or evokes emotion is important but most important is how I feel when I’m creating. I find myself in a state of continuous research and experimentation, through the use of different mediums and tools in conjunction with particular techniques.

In 2020, a particularly difficult period for many, I turned to art more than ever, creating over 60 works. Until then, I had spent decades painting mostly for myself; my home, my family and friends, or just as a form of stress relief. But that year I decided that I would finally put my art out into the world and that 2021 would be the official launch of my art career. Since then, I have been invited to art residencies like ARiM and World of Co. My work has been selected to participate in international art shows like Art3F Monaco, Art Marbella, and Art Show International. I’m represented by multiple international galleries including Galería Gaudí, Van Gogh Gallery, Florence Contemporary Gallery, and White’s Art Gallery.

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom
1/9

I enjoy testing and challenging the limitations of the surfaces I paint upon and drawing out the qualities of the medium as an expressive tool with boundaries unknown. This risk-taking has resulted in both destruction and exciting breakthroughs in my work.
When I create, I do not make art to sell. While I do make art that I myself would enjoy seeing in my home or workspace, most of all, I seek growth and change, both as an artist and as a person, as an ongoing process of becoming.

After quarantine, I wanted to bring a little levity to my art. I was inspired to create this series of abstract florals to represent a sense of rebirth and a blossoming of hope to commemorate what it felt like the world was collectively experiencing. I also wanted a send of distortion.This represents the “new normal”: being ready to come out into the light, but the world is no longer the way it was. So much has changed while so much seems to be the same. Familiar yet unfamiliar all at once.

“The common denominator is grounded in a special fascination for exploration, newness, freshness. Creating something that surprises or evokes emotion is important but most important is how I feel when I’m creating. I find myself in a state of continuous research and experimentation, through the use of different mediums and tools in conjunction with particular techniques.”

I was inspired to create this series of abstract florals to represent a sense of rebirth and a blossoming of hope to commemorate what it felt like the world was collectively experiencing. While the colors are bright, there is still a sense of distortion.The flowers are not easily identified, and while you have a sense of familiarity you also get the feeling you are seeing something divergent from reality. This represents the “new normal” to me.

Drawing is where art begins, with the beauty of line and form, and even when there is no clear drawing involved in my paintings there is always a sense of composition. Then there is the contrast between light and dark, imparting contrast, depth and tension to the artwork. And the choice of color – or lack thereof – can also send an impactful message when creating.

Prize Ribbon (1)

Prize Ribbon (1)

Describe your image

I was inspired post-pandemic to create this series of abstract florals to represent a sense of rebirth and a blossoming of hope that it felt like the world was collectively experiencing. While the colors are bright, there is still a sense of distortion.The flowers are not easily identified, and while you have a sense of familiarity you also get the feeling you are seeing something divergent from reality. This represents the “new normal”.

I believe that the human countenance will always be my timeless inspiration and the place that I will always return to. However, more and more now, I gravitate towards the surrealist and the abstract for portraiture but also conceptual art in general. If abstraction can be defined as existing in thought or as an idea but not having a physical or concrete existence; so, too, my works are often a reflection of how, what I see in the visual world, touches a deeper side of my humanity, blurring the boundaries of the real and the imaginary, the perceptible and the enigmatic. My work invites the viewer to seek personal meanings and delve into the colors or textures and upon closer inspection, see the beauty in the imperfections.